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Ten Must-Haves In Any RV Emergency

Ten Must-Haves in Any RV Emergency

In an emergency, remember: “The first 72 are on you.” In other words, during a major disaster, it’s likely that responders will be so tied up with stabilizing the situation and dealing with the most life-threatening elements that it could easily be three full days before they get to other demands. It’s important, then, that RV travelers make preparations for getting through those first 72 hours without services, regardless of whether the emergency is due to flooding, winter storms, earthquakes, wildfires or man-made events.
Some basic items to have in your emergency cache should include:

1. Water: Water keeps all your bodily systems functioning properly, and the average person will only survive for three days without it. For preparedness, it’s recommended that one gallon per person per day be stored in an approved container. It’s also wise to have a plan for treating water if your initial supply is exhausted.
2. Food: High-protein items curb hunger pangs and high-calorie foods give you the energy to function. Be sure to store foods you like to eat because, in a stressful situation, you may lose your appetite. Pack things that keep well: peanut butter, nuts, canned meats and granola bars. If you want to diversify, consider instant soup mixes or freeze-dried meals, but be sure to include a means to prepare them.
3. Insulation: While your RV itself – if intact after a disaster – will shield you from the elements, it will be important to have a means of staying warm in the event that fuel sources are exhausted. A sleeping bag for each person, rated for ten degrees cooler than any weather you expect to encounter is a good idea. Clothing that retains its insulation value even when wet, such as wool and fleece, are also good to keep around.
4. First-aid kit: A pre-assembled kit from the local pharmacy or big box store is an acceptable starting point, but be sure to add to this those items tailored to your family’s anticipated needs, including a supply of extra over-the-counter and prescription medications. Ideally, your skill set should match your gear. A tourniquet and a tracheotomy kit, for instance, are more of a liability than an asset if you don’t know how to use them.
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5. Tools: “The right tool for the right job” is a mantra we hear often, but never is it more relevant than when you’re tasked with making a repair in a hurry. An adjustable wrench may work in a particular situation, but would a dedicated socket wrench make that job easier? And just as important as having the right tools is keeping them organized in such a manner as to make them easily accessible when you need them the most.
6. Extra parts: Belts, hoses, hose clamps, spark plugs, bulbs and fuses require relatively little space but can save the day if you break down.
8. Flashlights and extra batteries: Repairing a tire, collecting water or traveling across unfamiliar terrain are all frustrating and potentially deadly in the dark. A decent flashlight that you can keep on your person at all times is a good investment for each family member. Spare batteries are must-haves, too.
8. Flashlights and extra batteries: Repairing a tire, collecting water or traveling across unfamiliar terrain are all frustrating and potentially deadly in the dark. A decent flashlight that you can keep on your person at all times is a good investment for each family member. Spare batteries are must-haves, too.
9. Spare cash: Don’t depend on the convenience of plastic in a disaster scenario, when electricity and phone lines could be down. Keep some cash handy for purchasing fuel, food or services.
10. NOAA weather radio: Have you ever tried to search for a weather report on FM radio? You’ll eventually hear one, but you may have to endure a few songs and some snappy DJ banter first. A NOAA radio, on the other hand, broadcasts forecasts, warnings, watches and other information 24 hours a day, seven days a week from the nearest National Weather Service office.